skip to main content

Interesting connection between the experience of awe and the percieved flow of time

Cover image for a video on Melanie Rudd talking about Awe and her research at the Stanford Business School

This video by Stanford Business and Melanie Rudd is super interesting. Do you have an experience of too little time. Are you time hungry? Here’s one way to alleviate the experience of too little time.

3 Responses to “Interesting connection between the experience of awe and the percieved flow of time”

  1. David Cory says:

    Thanks for this, Sherwin, I never really thought about the power of awe, but it really is powerful in terms of how it modifies behaviour. I think that we, as leaders, have an imperative to inspire awe in others to increase and improve employee engagement and discretionary effort and if we can understand more about what elicits awe in others, we will be that much more effective. Great food for thought!

  2. Jenn Lofgren says:

    In our society we are often caught with moving on to the next task, the next goal, the next anything without taking the time to be in the moment and experience awe. A great leader brings this critical gift to their team by modeling the way and making the joy of experiencing the moment and being in awe something that should never be rushed. This gives team members the permission to enjoy this often guilty pleasure without guilt and the inspiration that comes from those moments is pure gold.

    Thanks for the inspirational moment Sherwin!

  3. Sherwin says:

    You’re both welcome. So cool that you both see this research through the lens of leadership. So true that leaders have a duty to inspire, but also a duty to make space and create permission for inspiration.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Know. Engage. Lead.

We provide training, assessment and coaching for managers and leaders who want to improve team functioning, work effectiveness and profits.

Get training